G or GG stamp on blade ricasso

Jim McDougall
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Re: G or GG stamp on blade ricasso

Post by Jim McDougall » Wed Feb 27, 2019 11:15 pm

It seems I read that Thomas Gill was quite overbearing as a self promoter, much to the dismay of his competitors, and typically well emblazoned his name and the warranted theme on his blades. I do not think a simple 'G' would have sat well with him, and I think it has been well determined that the G and GG are associated in the Osborn (and Gunby) context.

As far as I have known, and what I believe you are thinking of Will, is the GG stamp which appeared later in the 19th c. with German trade blades typically. The GG stood for Ges Gescht or something of this ilk signifying a legal situation like a patent etc. I cannot recall details but usually these were on blades going to colonial areas. The only real declaration of 'fine steel' I am aware of was through the 19th c. with the term 'EISENHAUER' (=iron cutter) which extolled the virtue of the blade. This word was often mistaken for a makers name.

Bryce
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Re: G or GG stamp on blade ricasso

Post by Bryce » Sun Mar 03, 2019 1:12 am

"I read years ago the G represented good cast steel from German manufacture. Unfortunately I did not make a note of the reference.
Are there known German made swords with the same G marking? If not we could rule out German manufactured import blades."

G'day Will,

There doesn't seem to be any evidence for this in German swords of the Napoleonic period. Runkel imported all of his blades from Solingen and I have never seen a Runkel or any other Solingen blade of this period with a G or GG stamp.

I came across a picture of a blade with a "B" stamped on the ricasso on another forum. Perhaps it is as easy as "G" for good and "B" for bad. The G stamps are often obscured by the guard or langets, which means they were done when the blade was bare. As all Osborn marked swords we come across now have a G stamp, presumably this means they passed quality control. If a blade failed the quality control tests perhaps it was stamped with a B to show it had been tested and failed and was then scrapped. Swords with a GG stamp may have been tested twice for some reason and passed both times? Does anyone know of a sword with a B stamp?


Cheers,

Bryce
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Bryce
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Re: G or GG stamp on blade ricasso

Post by Bryce » Tue Mar 05, 2019 2:58 am

G'day Guys,

Another example by Osborn and Gunby which doesn't appear to have a G stamp. This one has an unusual blade and by the almost "1827 pattern" looking hilt must have been manufactured close to the end of Osborn and Gunby in 1820. This sword is part of the Royal Museums Greenwich collection.
Cheers,
Bryce
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Bryce
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Re: G or GG stamp on blade ricasso

Post by Bryce » Tue Mar 05, 2019 3:26 am

G'day Guys,

Here is an Osborn marked 1796 Infantry Officer's spadroon with the GG stamp. This one shows nicely that the GG was formed by stamping a single G twice.
Cheers,
Bryce
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Bryce
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Re: G or GG stamp on blade ricasso

Post by Bryce » Sun Mar 10, 2019 11:55 pm

Here is an Osborn and Gunby marked 1796 Infantry Officer's spadroon with the GG stamp. Compare this GG stamp with the Osborn marked example above.
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Chris A
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Location: Surrey

Re: G or GG stamp on blade ricasso

Post by Chris A » Mon Mar 11, 2019 8:49 am

The different style of G stamp could mean that each workman had his own stamp and there is no significance between the different types. Or could a stamp be worn, lost or broken and a replacement obtained. I sometimes wonder if we read too much in to these things. After all, what would the reason be for changing the style of the letter ?

Bryce
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Joined: Sun Feb 17, 2019 8:21 pm

Re: G or GG stamp on blade ricasso

Post by Bryce » Mon Mar 11, 2019 8:29 pm

G'day Chris,

I agree, it does sound unlikely and yet seems to hold true. I have looked at every Osborn and every Osborn and Gunby example I could find on the net. Admittedly you can usually only get a good look at the ricasso on 1796 infantry spadroons, 1803's and 1796 HCO's without langets, but on every example the Osborn G is different to the Osborn and Gunby G as illustrated above. Perhaps the original set of punches wore out around the time of the change to Osborn and Gunby and were all exchanged for a new set? I imagine the sans serif G punch would be a little cheaper than the original. Regardless, it appears to be a useful dating tool on unmarked, G stamped blades.

If more people would examine their own swords and report the results, we could get a more robust result. Another Osborn and Gunby marked blade with the sans serif GG stamp below.


Cheers,
Bryce
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Rob O'Reilly
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Re: G or GG stamp on blade ricasso

Post by Rob O'Reilly » Sat Mar 16, 2019 4:46 pm

As promised,

Here are a couple of pics of my pre-1815 O&G 1796 LC variant (likely for dismounted officer) with the G found on both sides of the blade.

Rob
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Bryce
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Re: G or GG stamp on blade ricasso

Post by Bryce » Sat Mar 16, 2019 8:23 pm

Great work Rob.
As expected it is the sans serif G used by Osborn and Gunby.
Cheers,
Bryce

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