Royal Armouries website photo copyright markings

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Will
Posts: 130
Joined: Wed Feb 13, 2019 10:27 pm

Royal Armouries website photo copyright markings

Post by Will » Sun Jun 16, 2019 5:53 pm

Maybe I've not noticed this before, the Royal Armouries website has put their name many times on each photo basically ruining the look.
https://collections.royalarmouries.org/ ... e-469.html
Just because some on Ebay etc. do this does not make this a good idea.

Chris A
Posts: 53
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:54 pm
Location: Surrey

Re: Royal Armouries website photo copyright markings

Post by Chris A » Mon Jun 17, 2019 10:19 pm

Annoying but understandable. Too many people download other people’s photos for their own use without even asking permission. A dealer once used an image of one of my swords to illustrate the sort of sword he delt in although he had never owned it !

Chris

Juan J. Perez
Posts: 15
Joined: Fri Feb 22, 2019 4:41 pm

Re: Royal Armouries website photo copyright markings

Post by Juan J. Perez » Tue Jun 18, 2019 2:12 pm

On a side note, the text under the picture includes an interesting account of the real performance of this pattern in combat (not very satisfying, as expected). Very interesting indeed; of course cavalry swords were not the only ones to see real usage, but memories about other patterns are quite rare.

Jonathan Hopkins
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Feb 21, 2019 4:28 pm

Re: Royal Armouries website photo copyright markings

Post by Jonathan Hopkins » Thu Jun 27, 2019 9:05 pm

If you download the image it only has the RA logo in one corner.

David C
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri Feb 22, 2019 11:20 am

Re: Royal Armouries website photo copyright markings

Post by David C » Sat Jul 27, 2019 5:28 pm

I remember reading in Thomas Austin’s account of his time in Spain “Old Stick-leg” that he found the infantry sabre too curved in a melee to be useful - the hilt he said was more useful as a knuckle duster.

“.... The only use we could make of our weapons which were curved like reaping hooks was to jab away at the heads and faces of those in front of us. And I strongly suspect that some of those required the aid of a dentist when the fray was over. “
P 132

This seems to confirm Kincaid’s view

It’s clearly the 1803 he is talking about, there is a picture of his sword in the book. Although in black and white, and a naturally quite primitive photo, it seems to have an ivory grip. Austen finished his service as a major, which seems to debunk the idea that ivory 1803s were only worn by General Staff officers.

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id= ... kin=mobile

Juan J. Perez
Posts: 15
Joined: Fri Feb 22, 2019 4:41 pm

Re: Royal Armouries website photo copyright markings

Post by Juan J. Perez » Tue Jul 30, 2019 12:03 pm

Thanks David for such an interesting reference. Witnesses' accounts, instead of collectors' theories, are always very welcome!

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